‘Matrix Resurrections’ is loud, happy and elegant entertainment | Movie reviews








From left to right: Jessica Henwick, Keanu Reeves and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II in “The Matrix Resurrections”


Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures


By Chris Hewitt | Star Tribune

Is “The Matrix Resurrections” a kung fu movie? A techno-thriller? A shoot-’em-up? A comedy? A sequel that is also a satire of the sequel? Or a love story?

Well, Lana Wachowski’s daringly entertaining “Resurrections” combine all of these elements, while also mixing in flashbacks from the previous three “Matrix” films. There’s a lot going on on the screen, but it’s so skillfully balanced that it doesn’t even matter if, like me, your memory of other “Matrices” is low and you are sometimes not sure. of what exactly is going on.

At its core, “Resurrections” is a rescue film. Neo (Keanu Reeves) is a game designer from San Francisco who always finds himself slipping into an alternate reality where he is seen as a unique hero. He’s struggling to appease his boss snake (Jonathan Groff) and make sense of his trauma with his therapist (Neal Patrick Harris), but he’s in bad luck because, he says, “they took my life and turned it into a video game. “

“Resurrections” returns a few other characters from previous releases, including Carrie-Anne Moss’ Trinity (though there wasn’t enough of her and her crisp cheekbones until climax) and Jada Pinkett’s General Niobe. Smith.

The film also benefits from a slew of newcomers, including Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as the embodiment of Laurence Fishburne’s mysterious Morpheus (Fishburne is only glimpsed in flashbacks). Mateen (“The Watchmen”) is a charismatic addition, especially when it materializes in the form of a life-size work of art or demonstrates Morpheus’ penchant for vintage disco clothing circa 1975. Jessica Henwick as Bugs, a fierce Neo fangirl who joins in her attempt to save the lost love Trinity from oblivion.


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