Possessor: Uncut Review: Honestly Cool, However, Very Innovative Techno Horror Movie (Rating: ****)


Movie: Uncut Possessor

With: Andrea Riseborough, Christopher Abbott, Jennifer Jason Leigh


Director: Brandon Cronenberg

Evaluation: ****

Reviser: George Sylex

Overview – Brandon Cronenberg’s new film, Possessor, is particularly similar to the kind of film his father David Cronenberg would have made, while similarly producing his own way. He designates the younger Cronenberg as an important visual esthetician, which ends up having a slightly less difficult plot than it initially appears. Within the structure of a moderately recognizable tale about a professional killer who gets too close to his goal, however, Cronenberg conveys an instinctive horror and disheartening reflection on the idea of ​​character.

The film is a sci-fi thriller, with a bit of body loathing, for Cronenberg’s good measure. In this world, innovation exists to allow someone to occupy someone else’s body, taking over for a period of time. Tasya Vos (Andrea Riseborough) is a “specialist” for an organization that uses this brain integration technology. Under Girder’s (Jennifer Jason Leigh) course, Vos submits deaths to help the organization and its expensive clients. She’s the best they have, but it affects her negatively, both in various busy bodies and now in her own life, where brutal imagery is creeping in. After one last job before taking over from Girder as director, she relegated the group to Colin Tate (Christopher Abbott). What appears to be a possible activity confused at this stage quickly disintegrates. Not only does the pressure on her own brain become an issue, but Tate’s own brain is fighting her for control, putting them both in danger. The more they both fight, the more things get out of hand, with brutal results.

The film’s editorial on the risks of interference with innovation is somewhat immature, but the inner conflict between Tasya and Colin is significantly more charming, with Riseborough and Abbott both giving vivid, multi-layered displays as individuals mixing various characters. Abbott pulls off a particularly awkward accomplishment, playing Colin, Tasya inside Colin, and Tasya and Colin engaging in a lonely body, all the while viable separating between these different manifestations. Leigh is also great as a clearly despicable manager who seems thoughtful and understanding until she doesn’t get what she needs. His unpretentious control of the delicate Tasya pays off in one last spooky scene. The story is more sci-fi than horror, and once Cronenberg spreads the nuts and bolts, there are usually no mind-blowing turns. Yet the savagery is so exceptional and realistic, and Cronenberg portrays it in such vivid detail that it turns the story into something horrifying, helping the crowd remember the results of Tasya’s harsh activities.

Possessor: Uncut is obviously a stern encounter, when it comes to his nastiness and steadfast tone. For a few, this will end up being excessive. Brandon Cronenberg doesn’t avoid any bits of butchery, nor does he save characters that you may see enduring in different movies of this nature. For others, however, they will consider it to be a Cronenberg rally. It doesn’t matter if that makes a movie you can endure or not, well, it’s an individual decision. The owner isn’t as insightful or bad dreamy as this science fiction talk about innovation.

On a deeper level, Possessor Uncut is all about losing yourself. Tasya invests as much energy in being others as in acting naturally. Colin’s counterattack in this direction puts her in danger of evaporating as a whole, given that she is currently in a weak state. A real pressure emerges from this situation. Tasya submits wrongdoing, however we relate to her psychological delicacy. Colin, in the meantime, isn’t exactly the best person on the planet, despite the fact that we understand he didn’t pursue the experience of having his personality ripped off. His anger is legitimized, whether or not it is frightening.

Last word –Brandon Cronenberg has made a distinctly weird movie that is as steadily stimulating as it is scary. The possessor is an instinctive fright excursion which goes straight into the horror of the body and agitates the outlook.

Exciting sci-fi horror!

Possessor: Uncut Review: Honestly Cool, However, Very Innovative Techno Horror Movie (Rating: ****)

About George Sylex

Film critic, writer, critic, columnist

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Possessor: Uncut Review: Honestly Cool, However, Very Innovative Techno Horror Movie (Rating: ****)

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Uncut possessor

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Uncut possessor

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Brandon Cronenberg’s new film, Possessor, is particularly similar to the kind of film his father David Cronenberg would have made, while producing in the same way. He designates the younger Cronenberg as an important visual esthetician, which ends up having a slightly less difficult plotline than it initially appears. Within the structure of a moderately recognizable tale about a professional killer who gets too close to his goal, however, Cronenberg conveys an instinctive horror and disheartening reflection on the idea of ​​character.

deposit date

October 8, 2020


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